In the culmination chapter of Bonhoeffer’s look at Christian community as it should properly be in our lives, he notes that the Lord’s Supper is the fulfillment of such community. This is the time when Christians come together before the Lord, having engaged in communal worship, and time of prayer, and speaking, and listening, and serving, and as he lays out in this chapter, confessing to one another. This idea of the confession of sins is so apt to be lost in translation; there is much confusion surrounding what exactly confession means and what it should look like. …


In chapter 4, Bonhoeffer shifts to talking about how Christians in community together should interact and serve one another. Specific ways he touched on include how we should be helpful to one another, serve one another, speak to one another, listen to one another, and bear one another’s burdens. This week I will zoom in on the importance of bearing one another’s burdens, and the pertinence of this call in today’s church culture.

When considering supporting each other, suffering with each other, and bearing with each other, we must first remember and emphasize the fact that Christ did those things…


After having examined the ‘day together’ in Christian community, Bonhoeffer moves to talk about the ‘day alone’ in chapter 3. This focus, however, is not simply an explanation of how one should spend their time, or how the day should look when a believer is not amongst community, but it delves into the union between community and solitude, as well as the importance of the quality of each in a day. Bonhoeffer explains some common misconceptions of both silence and solitude. For one to be silent is not for them to be incapable of speech, but rather they are simply…


In chapter 2 of Bonhoeffer’s deep dive into community in the life of a Christian, he specifically focused on the day of a Christian in its relation to time with others. Some aspects he hit on were corporate worship, corporate prayer, fellowship during meal times, and the importance of discipline in various activities throughout the day. All the while, bringing the focus back onto how the community of Christians should play a role in that day and believers should engage with one another. …


This week I began reading Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s work, “Life Together,” which is a dive into Christian community and the life of a believer in terms of relating with God and others. This looks to be a very interesting and pertinent read, especially given life today which seems so disconnected and impersonal. As Christians, an understanding of engaging in true and meaningful community with God and each other is so important to intentionally living out our faith in a counter-Christian culture, as well as obeying God’s command to gather with other believers in order to glorify him and edify each other.


Chapter 7 of Machen, which also happened to be the conclusion of his deep dive into the interaction between modern liberal culture and Christianity, looked at the church, and some dangers it faces with the shift in modernized spiritual thinking. I found this chapter both interesting and pertinent to today’s day and age. I feel as though the modern church in America particularly has found itself in the shift from being based on sound, gospel-centered doctrine, to watering down the truth in order to ingratiate themselves with secular culture. This could also be in response to the classic cultural stereotype…


Chapter 6 of Machen shifted focus from Christ himself to the result of his work, which is salvation. This chapter addressed salvation, and what it truly is Scripturally, as well as some popular modern-liberal arguments and objections are against it (I should say against what Scripture tells us it is). I found this chapter to be enriching and flow smoothly and logically from the previous chapter focusing on the person of Christ. One objection that Machen addressed that stuck out to me was that one man (Jesus) could not possibly atone for all the sins of everyone. …


Chapter 5 of Machen focused on Jesus Christ. In this chapter, Machen examined the person of Christ, and analyzed what the Word says both about his humanity and his deity, and addressed certain modern liberal arguments against Christ being completely who the Bible says he is. One of these arguments was that Jesus was simply a great example for us to follow and attempt to be like, but that he wasn’t completely sinless; some modern liberals will even go so far as to say that either way, whether or not Jesus was sinless, it doesn’t altogether matter. This argument is…


This week I read chapter 4 of Machen, which zeroed in on the Bible, and the dispute of the inerrancy of Scripture versus the modernized humanistic interpretation of God’s Word. Machen made the argument that Scripture is God breathed and inspired without error. The Bible is unique in that throughout its entirety its content was inspired by the promptings of the Holy Spirit, and it all points back to the truth of the gospel of Jesus Christ. …


Chapter 3 of Machen focuses on another point of contention between modern liberalism and true Christianity, and that is the conception of God, and how we as humanity understand him and know him. On the first page of the chapter, Machen begins arguing that it is not enough simply to feel God’s presence, but rather we need to get to know God; the True God. Theology is not some lofty, philosophical, academic area of study that is not pertinent to everyday Christians. Rather, theology is simply what we know about God, what we learn about God, and who we understand…

Nick Songster

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